Inclusion of women and youth in planning and local governance through ICT

Mali

Women and young people’s rights, inclusion and empowerment

Mali is faced with a fragile national context that undermines the functioning of the Rule of Law and makes it difficult to exercise active citizenship.

The social fabric, intra-community and inter-generational relations are weakening and the relations with representatives of local authorities are deteriorating.

Furthermore, women are often excluded from local decision-making processes, having a negative impact on the communities’ sustainable human development (e.g. increasing socio-economic disparities and a feminisation of poverty).

Finally, elected women in the Kayes region struggle to assert women’s rights and promote equal opportunities in local planning and governance.

Empowering and connecting young Palestinian women and men to advance Gender Justice through digital space

Palestine

Women and young people’s rights, inclusion and empowerment

Although youth widely use the Internet and social media in OPT, their digital rights and spaces are jeopardized and are becoming less inclusive and safe. This is manifested in the increase of cybercrime rates evidenced in a study published in 2018 which reported that one out of every three Palestinian women were subjected to violence on social media. The lack of awareness and capacity of youth on safe access and use of the Internet coupled with the legal environment that violates their digital rights and their right to freedom of expression necessitates immediate action to ensure inclusive digital spaces for young Palestinian men and women.

The project aims to mobilise safe, accessible and inclusive digital rights and space in Palestine, by promoting (i) Women’s political participation and leadership, (ii) Women’s Rights, and (iii) by preventing Gender-based violence.

Legal Empowerment of Women Using Innovation and Technology - LEWUTI

Uganda

Women and young people’s rights, inclusion and empowerment

Due to several contributory factors, most Ugandans – especially women, have very limited access to legal services, particularly in rural areas. For instance, most local leaders (cultural and political) have a wrong belief that women cannot own land although the law says otherwise. As a result, their rights are infringed upon, they have limited recourse for injustice and therefore do not enjoy the full potential of rights and duties they are entitled to.

The project mobilizes digital solutions to overcome physical and financial barriers to reach legal support while addressing the structural gender inequalities that prevents women from accessing justice

Afriscout

Tanzania

Climate Smart Agriculture

Traditional livestock herders, known as pastoralists, serve as the primary custodians of Tanzania’s grasslands - one of the most important ecosystems and a critical resource for addressing climate change. However changing climatic conditions, coupled with the limited field of vision when using traditional methods of finding pasture, has severely limited the predictive capacity of pastoralists in effectively managing herd movement. As a result, a typical household loses over a quarter of their livestock every year and rangelands continue to deteriorate.

Digital information system for transhumance relief in the Central Sahel region - SIT SAHEL LAFIA

Burkina Faso

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Mali

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Niger

Climate Smart Agriculture

Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger are three Sahelian pastoralist countries, where 86% of the total area (2,781,205 km²) is semi-arid to arid. These countries have a total of 138,592,224 head of cattle. This shows that livestock farming is at the heart of the livelihood dynamics of the most vulnerable.

However, livestock farmers regularly face the effects of climate change: droughts, floods and epizootics. These shocks are compounded by conflict, making it difficult for livestock owners to move around and keep their livestock. This makes information a valuable decision-making tool for them. To meet this need, the project offers the ‘SIT’ (Système d’Information aux Transhumants) to livestock farmers.

Mitigation, adaptation and productivity for Climate Smart Agriculture - iMAP4CSA

Tanzania

Climate Smart Agriculture

Smallholder rice farmers in Tanzania are confronted with many difficulties, such as:

1. Climate change challenges like floods and drought

2. Inefficient use of water

3. Limited knowledge of Good Agronomic practices

4. Farming remains subsistence, as smallholder farmers lack access to capital from financial institution to be able to adopt improved farming technologies, buy improved seeds, fertilizer, agrochemicals and cover cost of their farming operations such as plowing, transplanting, weeding, bird scaring and harvesting

5. Limited access to timely and accurate information for better farming decisions making i.e. plot size

Digital advisory services for Climate Smart Agriculture - DAS4CSA

Senegal

Climate Smart Agriculture

In Senegal, agriculture can contribute to improving the living conditions of rural communities.

A fundamental challenge remains the lack of quality, gender-sensitive and real-time information, communication and extension services for women and men farmers. Many women and marginalised groups have very little access to productive assets, agricultural support services, climate adaptation measures, agricultural knowledge or other practices to improve livelihoods.

Furthermore, exchanges between farmers and stakeholders remain limited.

Drone-assisted land mapping for Climate Smart cashew production - CajuLab

Benin

Climate Smart Agriculture

Benin aims to double its cashew nut production by 2021. Cashew nuts are Benin’s second largest export crop and the government recently set a production target of 300,000 tonnes per year. To achieve this, the government plans to increase the area under cashew cultivation to 60,000 hectares. However, if the cashew sector does not adopt an appropriate strategy, this growth in production may not result in net environmental benefits, or even lead to a loss of biodiversity and a negative impact on marginalised populations. Climate-smart agriculture offers a solution to tackle these challenges.

Mama Rescue: Transportation that saves the lives of mothers and babies

Uganda

eHealth

In Uganda, 7000 women and 45,000 newborns die annually due to complications of pregnancy and childbirth. 90% of these deaths are due to 3 delays:

  • Delay in decision to seek care
  • Delay in reaching care due
  • Delay in receiving adequate health care

In certain communities, women often travel long distances to reach a health center. They are forced to deliver in villages without a skilled attendant due to lack of funds for transport or the poor quality of the roads. Therefore, Mama Rescue intends to address the second delay, reducing the time to access quality care.

Community health, digital and communication technologies in Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso

eHealth

Despite real progress, child mortality in Burkina Faso remains very high due to poor access to health services, especially in rural areas. Community-based health workers (CBHWs), who are supposed to offer initial advice and health care to people living far from health centres, are poorly equipped and their services are often of poor quality.

The authorities have adopted the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (PCIME) strategy, which is implemented at the community level by CBHWs. They need to be trained and supervised regularly, but due to lack of resources, this is not always the case.

Medicapt: Technology in service of justice

DR Congo

eHealth

Every year, tens of thousands of adults and children are sexually violated in conflict zones around the world. Most survivors do not report these crimes, but for those who do, often their cases fail due to poor evidence.

Forensic exams are rarely conducted, medical charts are incomplete, and clinicians, law enforcement officers, lawyers, and judges don't communicate with or understand each other.

Health facilities and police stations using paper forms often lack proper storage for secure preservation. They often also encounter difficulties when travelling long distances to retrieve evidence due to poor roads or lack of access to vehicles.

To address these challenges, even in the most resource-constrained environments, Physicians for Human Rights developed MediCapt, a mobile application to help clinicians document forensic evidence of sexual violence during a patient encounter.

It's envisioned as a tool that clinicians could use to collect, securely store, and safely share forensic evidence of sexual and gender based crimes with legal, and law enforcement professionals while keeping chain of custody, safeguarding patient privacy, protecting witness identities, and preventing destruction or loss of vital evidence.

Supporting the Zanzibar new health financing strategy, to ensure better quality care and achieve UHC

Tanzania

eHealth

In Zanzibar, healthcare services are fully subsidized by the government. As a result of an under-performing economy, healthcare is suffering from a chronic underfunding resulting into an unsatisfactory quality and poor health outcomes.

As a response, the government is working with several partners to review the health financing strategy and improve quality of care as it strives to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC).

PharmAccess will provide technical assistance for the Zanzibar Government’s 5-years insurance plan to re-design the financing strategy of the current healthcare system and implement a digital model for quality improvement.

Using AI and Machine Learning to personalise and improve perinatal health in Zanzibar

Tanzania

eHealth

Zanzibar faces high levels of neonatal mortality as a result of delays or inability to seek care and biological risk factors that go undetected due to lack of contact with providers. Moreover, the health system in general suffers from a lack of resources, especially for Community Health Workers (CHWs).

The Government of Zanzibar is implementing a national digitally-supported community health program to provide essential health, nutrition, and development services to pregnant women and children.

In that framework, machine learning (ML) is an innovative approach that has potential to improve effectiveness and efficiency of service delivery of Maternal Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH).

Breaking Through Barriers: Digital Community and Connectivity in Palestine

Palestine

Closing the digital divide through education, training and the world of work

Palestine has a well-educated youth population, whose potential is stunted by high unemployment rates, lack of local job opportunities and a difficult security situation that severely restricts movement.

The project aims to increase long-term income generation capacity for young Palestinians by accelerating coding skills, developing digital marketing and business skills, and strengthening a self-supporting community of aspiring freelance and salaried tech sector employees.

This initiative builds on Mercy Corps’ established Gaza Sky Geeks tech education and community building experience.

Take IT Forward: Empowering Moroccan Youth Through Digital Skills and Jobs in the ICT Sector

Morocco

Closing the digital divide through education, training and the world of work

The «Take IT Forward» project aims to meet the dual challenge of employability of young graduates and the competitiveness of companies in the ICT sector in Morocco.

The digital sector is the second largest job-creating sector in Morocco (10%) with outlets such as IT development, customer service, web marketing or community management.

However, 45% of companies have difficulty in finding candidates because of the inadequacy of training and employment, a high turnover rate (30%) and difficulty in finding profiles adapted to the requirements of the profession (mindset and soft skills). Moreover, the proportion of women in digital professions remains very low.

Supporting Coding among Rwandan Adolescents & Teachers through the Curriculum & Clubs Heading for Rwanda 2050

Rwanda

Closing the digital divide through education, training and the world of work

To achieve Rwanda’s vision to become a high-income country and transition to a service economy by 2050, digital skills among the population are crucial.

Recently, Rwanda has made progress in increasing access to education. However, challenges remain to improve the quality of education and ensure equity. Although more girls are enrolled in secondary education than boys, they do not choose ICT nor science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) because they believe that these are subjects for boys who outperform them in these disciplines.

Rwanda’s curriculum emphasizes creativity, problem solving and collaboration, but many teachers struggle to develop these competences.

Digital skills and inclusion through libraries in Uganda

Uganda

Closing the digital divide through education, training and the world of work

Just 48% of people in Uganda are using the Internet, according to the Uganda Communications Commission (2019). The three main obstacles to Internet use are lack of free or affordable access to technology, lack of computer and on-line literacy skills, and limited awareness about the potential of the Internet.

Women and unemployed youth are especially marginalized in a digital environment. Women and girls have limited independent sources of income, lower literacy levels and lack confidence with technology. Unemployed young people also struggle to afford Internet access and need practical and marketable digital skills.

Socio-economic reintegration of vulnerable children and young people through the provision of digital spaces and incubation for education and access to the world of work

Burkina Faso

Closing the digital divide through education, training and the world of work

The RESOLAB project builds on the organisation’s (Terre des Hommes - Lausanne) consolidated experience in promoting the digital inclusion of vulnerable youth and children, based on a contextual analysis of the problems of child and youth workers in gold panning sites in the province of Ganzourgou, in central Burkina Faso.

Within the specific country and intervention context, the project wishes to address the significant education, training and employment needs of children and young people and to reduce the vulnerability of many of them who are turning to the rapidly expanding traditional gold panning industry.

Decentralised Decision Room-Planning Decision Support System

Rwanda

Resilient cities: towards inclusive and sustainable urban development

The main challenge urban planners are facing today is the lack of access to updated data, and insufficient means to extract meaningful information from the available data; mainly due to the cost and inadequate skills. The backbone of this project is to engage different stakeholders (including professionals, local authorities, members of the private sector and the general public) to actively participate in the collection of real time updated spatial and non-spatial data which is reliable for planning purposes, easily accessible and informative.

Two Secondary cities (Musanze and Rubavu) and three satellite cities (Rwamagana, Bugesera and Muhanga) will be equipped with capabilities (skills, equipment and data) to carry out informed situation analysis through the use of the decentralised Spatial Development Framework (SDF) and decision room to enable a resilient, sustainable and integrated urban development. The system is already used at national level by the Ministry of Infrastructure as an implementing tool of the Spatial Development Framework (SDF) but needs decentralising to be more effective. The system makes use of big data, location, multi-criteria evaluation and a citizen participation-based approach to identify potential infrastructural projects and areas of intervention. The decentralisation of the decision room to five regional cities aims to efficiently coordinate, plan and guide decision-making for (public) infrastructures and facilities and to effectively serve their purpose while saving financial resources.

 

Scaling up a participatory and citizen-driven air pollution sensing and analysis system for urban resilience in Uganda (AirQo)

Uganda

Resilient cities: towards inclusive and sustainable urban development

Kampala city and other urban environments in Uganda have no regular monitoring of environmental exposures leading to a scarcity of air quality data, both in quantity and quality. This leaves urban communities uninformed about their exposure and as a result, there is limited public awareness of the impact of pollution on health . Urban dwellers in informal settlements are most affected by environmental health risks because they have limited options for housing, energy sources and tend to be  concentrated nearby industries to access employment opportunities. Without data and evidence, it is not possible for them to engage and demand for action   from city duty bearers. Similarly, Kampala city duty bearers, private sector and the government lack accurate information on the environmental exposures to act. Traditional  urban sensing systems  tend to be expensive, complex  to setup and unsuitable for the African urban contexts.

The AirQo system provides timely and hyperlocal access to air quality information for urban dwellers and duty beaters in Kampala city allowing them to take actions that lead to improvement of air quality in their communities. The AirQo digital air quality platform leverages locally built low cost technologies and artificial intelligence approaches, to close the gaps in air quality information access and allow for active citizen engagement in air urban environmental issues.

Urban Climate Information Platform (u-CLIP)

Niger

Resilient cities: towards inclusive and sustainable urban development

Climate change projections point towards increasingly devastating heatwaves occurring in Africa in the decades to come. In cities, exposure to extreme heat is exacerbated by the phenomenon of urban heat islands and poor housing conditions, inducing health and other impacts, and affecting vulnerable population groups in particular.

Yet, today, the formulation of effective climate resilience measures is strongly hampered by a lack of suitable and accessible urban climate information. The ambition of u-CLIP is to meet this data need, aiming to support the formulation of adequate resilience measures by policy makers and other stakeholders.

Innovative, clean, resilient and participatory cities in Mozambique

Mozambique

Resilient cities: towards inclusive and sustainable urban development

In Mozambique, Urban Solid Waste Management is not effective, especially in the peri-urban areas of the large cities, which affects the health of citizens, who feel marginalised. The population is not very involved in the respect and management of public sanitation. The majority of inhabitants try to dispose of uncollected waste themselves (more than 60% in Nampula and 70% in Beira) by burning it or taking it to open dumps without any control. On the other hand, municipalities cannot optimise service provision because they do not have data on the most frequent types of problems in each part of the city.

The project is part of the National Strategy for Integrated Urban Solid Waste Management in Mozambique 2013-2025. The objective is to increase solid waste collection in the cities of Nampula and Beira by 20%, particularly in disadvantaged, hard-to-reach areas, in order to reduce the negative environmental impact of cities and support sustainable urbanisation. To achieve this objective, it will strengthen the municipalities' intervention and waste management capacities in a sustainable manner, promote the involvement of civil society and establish an inter-municipal network, including Maputo, to exchange and collect good practices and encourage a geographical and thematic expansion of the platform.

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